PSYCHOLOGIST

Erik Erikson

1902 - 1994

Erik Erikson

Erik Homburger Erikson (born Erik Salomonsen; 15 June 1902 – 12 May 1994) was a German-American developmental psychologist and psychoanalyst known for his theory on psychological development of human beings. He may be most famous for coining the phrase identity crisis. His son, Kai T. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Erik Erikson has received more than 1,871,838 page views. His biography is available in 48 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 12th most popular psychologist.

Memorability Metrics

  • 1.9M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 73.40

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 48

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 11.12

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 2.69

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Erik Eriksons by language


Among PSYCHOLOGISTS

Among psychologists, Erik Erikson ranks 12 out of 169Before him are Erich Fromm, John Dewey, Jacques Lacan, Lev Vygotsky, Wilhelm Wundt, and William James. After him are Carl Rogers, Viktor Frankl, Gustave Le Bon, B. F. Skinner, Albert Bandura, and Anna Freud.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1902, Erik Erikson ranks 7Before him are Ruhollah Khomeini, Karl Popper, Charles Lindbergh, John Steinbeck, Leni Riefenstahl, and Paul Dirac. After him are Carl Rogers, Georgy Malenkov, Halldór Laxness, Nâzım Hikmet, Talcott Parsons, and Fernand Braudel. Among people deceased in 1994, Erik Erikson ranks 9Before him are Richard Nixon, Charles Bukowski, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Linus Pauling, Erich Honecker, and Elias Canetti. After him are Eugène Ionesco, Ayrton Senna, Andrei Chikatilo, Antônio Carlos Jobim, Burt Lancaster, and Kurt Cobain.

Others Born in 1902

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Others Deceased in 1994

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In Germany

Among people born in Germany, Erik Erikson ranks 115 out of 3,763Before him are Carl Orff (1895), Leni Riefenstahl (1902), Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472), Wilhelm Wundt (1832), Charles the Fat (839), and Ernst Röhm (1887). After him are Alfred Jodl (1890), Arminius (-17), Henry the Fowler (876), Walter Gropius (1883), Karl Dönitz (1891), and Frederick III, German Emperor (1831).