WRITER

Nikolai Gogol

1809 - 1852

Photo of Nikolai Gogol

Icon of person Nikolai Gogol

Nikolai Vasilyevich Gogol (1 April [O.S. 20 March] 1809 – 4 March [O.S. 21 February] 1852) was a Russian novelist, short story writer, and playwright of Ukrainian origin. Gogol used the grotesque in his writings, for example in his works "The Nose", "Viy", "The Overcoat", and "Nevsky Prospekt". These stories, and others such as "Diary of a Madman", have also been noted for their proto-surrealist qualities. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Nikolai Gogol has received more than 3,048,066 page views. His biography is available in 104 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 99 in 2019). Nikolai Gogol is the 69th most popular writer (up from 81st in 2019), the 5th most popular biography from Ukraine (down from 4th in 2019) and the most popular Ukrainian Writer.

Nikolai Gogol is most famous for his short story "The Nose," which is about a man who wakes up one morning to find that his nose has disappeared.

Memorability Metrics

  • 3.0M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 78.87

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 104

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 7.64

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 5.30

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Notable Works

Revizor
Social life and customs, Russian language, Readers
Dead Souls (Mertvye dushi)
Criticism and interpretation, Fiction, Fiction in Spanish
Dead Souls is a socially critical black comedy. Set in Russia before the emancipation of serfs in 1861, the "dead souls" are dead serfs still being counted by landowners as property, as well as referring to the landowners' morality. Through surreal and often dark comedy, Gogol criticizes Russian society after the Napoleonic Wars. He intended to also offer solutions to the problems he satirized, but died before he ever completed the second part of what was intended to be a trilogy. The work famously ends mid-sentence.
Dead Souls
Classic Literature, Fiction
Dead Souls is a socially critical black comedy. Set in Russia before the emancipation of serfs in 1861, the "dead souls" are dead serfs still being counted by landowners as property, as well as referring to the landowners' morality. Through surreal and often dark comedy, Gogol criticizes Russian society after the Napoleonic Wars. He intended to also offer solutions to the problems he satirized, but died before he ever completed the second part of what was intended to be a trilogy. The work famously ends mid-sentence.
Shinelʹ
Russian language, Textbooks for foreign speakers, Readers
Taras Bulba
Fiction, Russia in fiction, Russian language
Short stories
Accessible book, Fiction, Social life and customs

Among WRITERS

Among writers, Nikolai Gogol ranks 69 out of 7,302Before him are Rabindranath Tagore, Arthur Conan Doyle, Umberto Eco, Heinrich Heine, Romain Rolland, and Bertolt Brecht. After him are Li Bai, Charles Perrault, Milan Kundera, Robert Frost, Theodor Herzl, and Jorge Luis Borges.

Most Popular Writers in Wikipedia

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1809, Nikolai Gogol ranks 5Before him are Charles Darwin, Edgar Allan Poe, Abraham Lincoln, and Felix Mendelssohn. After him are Louis Braille, Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, Georges-Eugène Haussmann, Albert Pike, Bruno Bauer, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and Joseph Liouville. Among people deceased in 1852, Nikolai Gogol ranks 1After him are Louis Braille, Ada Lovelace, Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, Friedrich Fröbel, Henry Clay, Auguste de Marmont, Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen, Johan Gadolin, Karl Bryullov, Friedrich Ludwig Jahn, and Vasily Zhukovsky.

Others Born in 1809

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Others Deceased in 1852

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In Ukraine

Among people born in Ukraine, Nikolai Gogol ranks 5 out of 1,365Before him are Leon Trotsky (1879), Hurrem Sultan (1502), Leonid Brezhnev (1906), and Golda Meir (1898). After him are Sergei Prokofiev (1891), Stepan Bandera (1909), John III Sobieski (1629), Kazimir Malevich (1879), Bohdan Khmelnytsky (1595), Joseph Conrad (1857), and Hafsa Sultan (1479).

Among WRITERS In Ukraine

Among writers born in Ukraine, Nikolai Gogol ranks 1After him are Joseph Conrad (1857), Taras Shevchenko (1814), Svetlana Alexievich (1948), Stanisław Lem (1921), Mikhail Bulgakov (1891), Anna Akhmatova (1889), Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (1836), Joseph Roth (1894), Sholem Aleichem (1859), Vasily Grossman (1905), and Lesya Ukrainka (1871).