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RELIGIOUS FIGURE

Haran

Photo of Haran

Icon of person Haran

Haran or Aran (Hebrew: הָרָן Hārān) is a man in the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. He died in Ur of the Chaldees, was a son of Terah, and brother of Abraham. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Haran has received more than 367,260 page views. His biography is available in 21 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 18 in 2019). Haran is the 787th most popular religious figure (up from 986th in 2019), the 90th most popular biography from Iraq (up from 122nd in 2019) and the 15th most popular Iraqi Religious Figure.

Memorability Metrics

  • 370k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 61.09

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 21

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 7.88

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 1.73

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Harans by language


Among RELIGIOUS FIGURES

Among religious figures, Haran ranks 787 out of 2,238Before him are Hemma of Gurk, Giovanni Battista Re, Nicolaus Zinzendorf, Vilna Gaon, Saint Malachy, and Mammes of Caesarea. After him are Rashid Rida, Eduardo Martínez Somalo, Saint Maurus, Antipope Dioscorus, Yamamoto Tsunetomo, and Apollinaris of Ravenna.

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In Iraq

Among people born in Iraq, Haran ranks 90 out of 338Before him are Nahor, son of Serug (-1912), Sumu-abum (-2000), Ubayd Allah ibn Ziyad (648), Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri (1941), Rashid ad-Din Sinan (1130), and Sajida Talfah (1937). After him are Ahmad ibn Tulun (835), Ziusudra (null), Al-Muntasir (837), Al-Mutanabbi (915), Samsu-iluna (-1792), and Nouri al-Maliki (1950).

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Among RELIGIOUS FIGURES In Iraq

Among religious figures born in Iraq, Haran ranks 15Before him are Muhammad al-Mahdi (869), Eber (-2038), Ibn Hisham (701), Junayd of Baghdad (830), Hillel the Elder (-110), and Nahor, son of Serug (-1912). After him are Ibn Sa'd (784), Ibn Qutaybah (828), Mohammad Hussein Fadlallah (1935), Suhayb ar-Rumi (587), Abo of Tiflis (756), and Bashar ibn Burd (714).