POLITICIAN

Hugh of Italy

880 - 947

Hugh of Italy

Hugh (c.880–947), known as Hugh of Arles or Hugh of Provence, was the King of Italy from 924 until his death. He belonged to the Bosonid family. During his reign, he empowered his relatives at the expense of the aristocracy and tried to establish a relationship with the Byzantine Empire. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Hugh of Italy has received more than 66,334 page views. His biography is available in 25 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 3,238th most popular politician.

Memorability Metrics

  • 66k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 60.40

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 25

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 7.56

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 1.93

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Hugh of Italies by language


Among POLITICIANS

Among politicians, Hugh of Italy ranks 3,217 out of 14,801Before him are Caranus of Macedon, Demaratus, Albert of Saxony, Gaius Flaminius, Ma Teng, and Christiane Eberhardine of Brandenburg-Bayreuth. After him are Natalya Naryshkina, Canute Lavard, Felipe González, Emperor Tenji, Beatrice of Portugal, and Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 880, Hugh of Italy ranks 2Before him is Louis the Blind. After him are Harthacnut I of Denmark, Lambert of Italy, Herbert II, Count of Vermandois, Abas I of Armenia, Beatrice of Vermandois, Fujiwara no Tadahira, and Hywel Dda. Among people deceased in 947, Hugh of Italy ranks 1After him are Emperor Taizong of Liao and Berthold, Duke of Bavaria.

Others Born in 880

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Others Deceased in 947

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In France

Among people born in France, Hugh of Italy ranks 1,062 out of 4,109Before him are Pierre Bouguer (1698), Pierre Schaeffer (1910), Bruno Latour (1947), James II of Majorca (1243), Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille (1713), and Guillaume Brune (1763). After him are Jaufre Rudel (1125), Michèle Morgan (1920), Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona (1082), Gabriel Lamé (1795), Jean Moulin (1899), and Jean de Lattre de Tassigny (1889).