WRITER

Fyodor Dostoevsky

1821 - 1881

Photo of Fyodor Dostoevsky

Icon of person Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (UK: , US: ; Russian: Фёдор Михайлович Достоевский, romanized: Fyodor Mikhaylovich Dostoyevskiy, IPA: [ˈfʲɵdər mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪdʑ dəstɐˈjefskʲɪj] ; 11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881), sometimes transliterated as Dostoyevsky, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist and journalist. Numerous literary critics regard him as one of the greatest and finest novelists in all of world literature, as many of his works are considered highly influential masterpieces. Dostoevsky's literary works explore the human condition in the troubled political, social, and spiritual atmospheres of 19th-century Russia, and engage with a variety of philosophical and religious themes. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Fyodor Dostoevsky has received more than 8,936,748 page views. His biography is available in 172 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 166 in 2019). Fyodor Dostoevsky is the 6th most popular writer (down from 5th in 2019), the 3rd most popular biography from Russia (up from 4th in 2019) and the most popular Russian Writer.

Fyodor Dostoevsky is most famous for his novel Crime and Punishment.

Memorability Metrics

  • 8.9M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 87.73

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 172

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 13.65

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 4.94

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Notable Works

The idiot
Social life and customs, Fiction, Social conditions
Crime and Punishment
English Translations, Russian literature, Novela psicológica
From [wikipedia][1]: Crime and Punishment (Russian: Преступлéние и наказáние, tr. Prestupleniye i nakazaniye; IPA: [prʲɪstʊˈplʲenʲə ɪ nəkɐˈzanʲə]) is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It was first published in the literary journal The Russian Messenger in twelve monthly installments during 1866.[1] It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing.[2] Crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov argues that with the pawnbroker's money he can perform good deeds to counterbalance the crime, while ridding the world of a worthless vermin. He also commits this murder to test his own hypothesis that some people are naturally capable of such things, and even have the right to do them. Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov justifies his actions by comparing himself with Napoleon Bonaparte, believing that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose. [1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_and_Punishment
A Raw Youth
Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 -- Translations into English, Social life and customs, Translations into English
Five classic stories in a new translation. The title story is on a relationship between a husband and his wife's lover, while A Nasty Anecdote is a satire on a tsarist official who considers himself humane.
The Brothers Karamazov
Literature - Classics / Criticism, Russian, Literature: Classics
The Brothers Karamazov, Dostoevsky’s crowning achievement, is a tale of patricide and family rivalry that embodies the moral and spiritual dissolution of an entire society (Russia in the 1870s). It created a national furor comparable only to the excitement stirred by the publication, in 1866, of Crime and Punishment. To Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov captured the quintessence of Russian character in all its exaltation, compassion, and profligacy. Significantly, the book was on Tolstoy’s bedside table when he died. Readers in every language have since accepted Dostoevsky’s own evaluation of this work and have gone further by proclaiming it one of the few great novels of all ages and countries. ([source][1]) [1]: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/42256/the-brothers-karamazov-by-fyodor-dostoevsky/9780679601814/
The gambler
Translations into English
Demons
Fiction, Russian fiction, Politics in fiction
Also known as *Demons* or *The Devils*, this is Dostoyevsky’s most political novel. Though critical of the left-wing revolutionaries, split as they often were into disparate factions and cells the author also tacitly rebukes the conservative elite for failing to come to terms with the high levels of disaffection in the country, a stance that would ultimately lead to their downfall.
Записки изъ подполья
Fiction, History
Преступление и наказание
English Translations, Russian literature, Novela psicológica
From [wikipedia][1]: Crime and Punishment (Russian: Преступлéние и наказáние, tr. Prestupleniye i nakazaniye; IPA: [prʲɪstʊˈplʲenʲə ɪ nəkɐˈzanʲə]) is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It was first published in the literary journal The Russian Messenger in twelve monthly installments during 1866.[1] It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing.[2] Crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov argues that with the pawnbroker's money he can perform good deeds to counterbalance the crime, while ridding the world of a worthless vermin. He also commits this murder to test his own hypothesis that some people are naturally capable of such things, and even have the right to do them. Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov justifies his actions by comparing himself with Napoleon Bonaparte, believing that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose. ---------- See also: - [Преступлéние и наказáние: 1/2](https://openlibrary.org/works/OL7998899W/Prestuplenie_i_nakazanie._1_2) [1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_and_Punishment
Идіотъ
Russia in fiction, Fiction, Social conditions
Inspired by an image of Christ's suffering, Fyodor Dostoyevsky set out to portray "a truly beautiful soul" colliding with the brutal reality of contemporary society. Returning to St. Petersburg from a Swiss sanatorium, the gentle and naive Prince Myshkin—known as "the idiot"—pays a visit to his distant relative General Yepanchin and proceeds to charm the General and his circle. But after becoming infatuated with the beautiful Nastasya Filippovna, Myshkin finds himself caught up in a love triangle and drawn into a web of blackmail, betrayal, and, ultimately, murder. This new translation by David McDuff is sensitive to the shifting registers of the original Russian, capturing the nervous, elliptic flow of the narrative for a new generation of readers.
Бѣсы
Fiction, Russian fiction, Politics in fiction
Also known as *Demons* or *The Devils*, this is Dostoyevsky’s most political novel. Though critical of the left-wing revolutionaries, split as they often were into disparate factions and cells the author also tacitly rebukes the conservative elite for failing to come to terms with the high levels of disaffection in the country, a stance that would ultimately lead to their downfall.
Братья Карамазовы
Literature - Classics / Criticism, Russian, Literature: Classics
The Brothers Karamazov, Dostoevsky’s crowning achievement, is a tale of patricide and family rivalry that embodies the moral and spiritual dissolution of an entire society (Russia in the 1870s). It created a national furor comparable only to the excitement stirred by the publication, in 1866, of Crime and Punishment. To Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov captured the quintessence of Russian character in all its exaltation, compassion, and profligacy. Significantly, the book was on Tolstoy’s bedside table when he died. Readers in every language have since accepted Dostoevsky’s own evaluation of this work and have gone further by proclaiming it one of the few great novels of all ages and countries. ([source][1])
Записки изъ подполья
Fiction, Officials and employees, History
Notes from Underground (pre-reform Russian: Записки изъ подполья; post-reform Russian: Записки из подполья, tr. Zapíski iz podpólʹya), also translated as Notes from the Underground or Letters from the Underworld, is an 1864 novella by Fyodor Dostoevsky. Notes is considered by many to be one of the first existentialist novels. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man), who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done? The second part of the book is called "Apropos of the Wet Snow" and describes certain events that appear to be destroying and sometimes renewing the underground man, who acts as a first person, unreliable narrator and anti-hero.
Братья Карамазовы
Literature - Classics / Criticism, Russian, Literature: Classics
The Brothers Karamazov, Dostoevsky’s crowning achievement, is a tale of patricide and family rivalry that embodies the moral and spiritual dissolution of an entire society (Russia in the 1870s). It created a national furor comparable only to the excitement stirred by the publication, in 1866, of Crime and Punishment. To Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov captured the quintessence of Russian character in all its exaltation, compassion, and profligacy. Significantly, the book was on Tolstoy’s bedside table when he died. Readers in every language have since accepted Dostoevsky’s own evaluation of this work and have gone further by proclaiming it one of the few great novels of all ages and countries. ([source][1])
Преступление и наказание
English Translations, Russian literature, Novela psicológica
From [wikipedia][1]: Crime and Punishment (Russian: Преступлéние и наказáние, tr. Prestupleniye i nakazaniye; IPA: [prʲɪstʊˈplʲenʲə ɪ nəkɐˈzanʲə]) is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It was first published in the literary journal The Russian Messenger in twelve monthly installments during 1866.[1] It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing.[2] Crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov argues that with the pawnbroker's money he can perform good deeds to counterbalance the crime, while ridding the world of a worthless vermin. He also commits this murder to test his own hypothesis that some people are naturally capable of such things, and even have the right to do them. Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov justifies his actions by comparing himself with Napoleon Bonaparte, believing that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose. ---------- See also: - [Преступлéние и наказáние: 1/2](https://openlibrary.org/works/OL7998899W/Prestuplenie_i_nakazanie._1_2) [1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_and_Punishment
Записки изъ подполья
Fiction, Officials and employees, History
Notes from Underground (pre-reform Russian: Записки изъ подполья; post-reform Russian: Записки из подполья, tr. Zapíski iz podpólʹya), also translated as Notes from the Underground or Letters from the Underworld, is an 1864 novella by Fyodor Dostoevsky. Notes is considered by many to be one of the first existentialist novels. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man), who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done? The second part of the book is called "Apropos of the Wet Snow" and describes certain events that appear to be destroying and sometimes renewing the underground man, who acts as a first person, unreliable narrator and anti-hero.
Бѣсы
Fiction, Russian fiction, Politics in fiction
Also known as *Demons* or *The Devils*, this is Dostoyevsky’s most political novel. Though critical of the left-wing revolutionaries, split as they often were into disparate factions and cells the author also tacitly rebukes the conservative elite for failing to come to terms with the high levels of disaffection in the country, a stance that would ultimately lead to their downfall.
Записки изъ подполья
Fiction, History
Идіотъ
Russia in fiction, Fiction, Social conditions
Inspired by an image of Christ's suffering, Fyodor Dostoyevsky set out to portray "a truly beautiful soul" colliding with the brutal reality of contemporary society. Returning to St. Petersburg from a Swiss sanatorium, the gentle and naive Prince Myshkin—known as "the idiot"—pays a visit to his distant relative General Yepanchin and proceeds to charm the General and his circle. But after becoming infatuated with the beautiful Nastasya Filippovna, Myshkin finds himself caught up in a love triangle and drawn into a web of blackmail, betrayal, and, ultimately, murder. This new translation by David McDuff is sensitive to the shifting registers of the original Russian, capturing the nervous, elliptic flow of the narrative for a new generation of readers.

Among WRITERS

Among writers, Fyodor Dostoevsky ranks 6 out of 7,302Before him are Homer, Dante Alighieri, William Shakespeare, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and Edgar Allan Poe. After him are J. R. R. Tolkien, Lord Byron, Voltaire, Hans Christian Andersen, Leo Tolstoy, and Victor Hugo.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1821, Fyodor Dostoevsky ranks 1After him are Charles Baudelaire, Gustave Flaubert, Hermann von Helmholtz, Rudolf Virchow, August Schleicher, Lola Montez, Elizabeth Blackwell, Auguste Mariette, Luitpold, Prince Regent of Bavaria, Louis Vuitton, and Richard Francis Burton. Among people deceased in 1881, Fyodor Dostoevsky ranks 1After him are Alexander II of Russia, Modest Mussorgsky, James A. Garfield, Benjamin Disraeli, Billy the Kid, Lewis H. Morgan, Matthias Jakob Schleiden, Jenny von Westphalen, Louis Auguste Blanqui, Thomas Carlyle, and Auguste Mariette.

Others Born in 1821

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Others Deceased in 1881

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In Russia

Among people born in Russia, Fyodor Dostoevsky ranks 3 out of 3,761Before him are Immanuel Kant (1724), and Vladimir Lenin (1870). After him are Leo Tolstoy (1828), Vladimir Putin (1952), Yuri Gagarin (1934), Mikhail Gorbachev (1931), Dmitri Mendeleev (1834), Anton Chekhov (1860), Peter the Great (1672), Nikita Khrushchev (1894), and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840).

Among WRITERS In Russia

Among writers born in Russia, Fyodor Dostoevsky ranks 1After him are Leo Tolstoy (1828), Anton Chekhov (1860), Alexander Pushkin (1799), Ayn Rand (1905), Maxim Gorky (1868), Isaac Asimov (1920), Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (1918), E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776), Vladimir Nabokov (1899), Boris Pasternak (1890), and Ivan Turgenev (1818).