WRITER

Shahrnush Parsipur

1946 - Today

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Shahrnush Parsipur (Persian: شهرنوش پارسی‌پور; born 17 February 1946) is an Iranian-born writer and translator. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Shahrnush Parsipur has received more than 76,425 page views. Her biography is available in 17 different languages on Wikipedia. Shahrnush Parsipur is the 5,766th most popular writer (down from 5,382nd in 2019), the 416th most popular biography from Iran (down from 357th in 2019) and the 57th most popular Iranian Writer.

Memorability Metrics

  • 76k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 45.05

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 17

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 2.10

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 3.12

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Notable Works

Khāṭirāt-i zindān
Prisoners' writings, Persian
Kissing the Sword
Political prisoners, Biography, Iranian Authors
Sag va zimistān-i buland
Roman persan
Touba and the Meaning of Night
Depression in women, Fiction, Shame
From a distinctly Iranian perspective, *Touba and the Meaning of Night* reveals ongoing tension between rationalism and mysticism, tradition and modernity, male and female, East and West. Speaking in an idiom unique to its author and indicative of a new tradition in Persian women's writing, the epic also defies Western stereotypes of Iranian women and Western expectations of Iranian literary form.
Zanān bidūn-i mardan
Feminist fiction, Fiction, Women
This modern literary masterpiece follows the interwoven destinies of five women — including a wealthy middle-aged housewife, a prostitute, and a school-teacher — as they arrive by different paths to live together in an abundant garden on the outskirts of Tehran. Drawing on elements of Islamic mysticism and recent Iranian history, this unforgettable novel depicts women escaping the narrow confines of family and society, and imagines their future living in a world without men.
Touba and the Meaning of Night
Depression in women, Iranian history, Shame
From a distinctly Iranian perspective, *Touba and the Meaning of Night* reveals ongoing tension between rationalism and mysticism, tradition and modernity, male and female, East and West. Speaking in an idiom unique to its author and indicative of a new tradition in Persian women's writing, the epic also defies Western stereotypes of Iranian women and Western expectations of Iranian literary form.

Page views of Shahrnush Parsipurs by language

Over the past year Shahrnush Parsipur has had the most page views in the with 35,815 views, followed by English (7,792), and German (1,211). In terms of yearly growth of page views the top 3 wikpedia editions are Malayalam (57.55%), Esperanto (8.57%), and Western Punjabi (8.51%)

Among WRITERS

Among writers, Shahrnush Parsipur ranks 5,766 out of 7,302Before her are Leena Krohn, Dániel Berzsenyi, Diana Der Hovanessian, Elena Maróthy-Šoltésová, Vincenzo Consolo, and Aleksandr Chakovsky. After her are Javed Akhtar, Julian Symons, Ulrich Plenzdorf, Daniel Pearl, Nigella Lawson, and Irmtraud Morgner.

Most Popular Writers in Wikipedia

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1946, Shahrnush Parsipur ranks 621Before her are Aleksandr Gorshkov, Martin Wolf, Valentin Gavrilov, Alfonso Lara, Andy Mackay, and Loleatta Holloway. After her are Ecaterina Stahl-Iencic, Marina Lewycka, Pearlette Louisy, John Urry, Eduard Krieger, and Dave Hill.

Others Born in 1946

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In Iran

Among people born in Iran, Shahrnush Parsipur ranks 416 out of 631Before her are Masih Alinejad (1976), Hossein Shahabi (1967), Mina Ahadi (1956), Alireza Faghani (1978), Bahman Ghobadi (1969), and Mahmoud Namjoo (1918). After her are Nazanin Boniadi (1979), Leila Hatami (1972), Abd al-Samad (1500), Guity Novin (1944), Mehdi Mahdavikia (1977), and Manouchehr Mottaki (1953).

Others born in Iran

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Among WRITERS In Iran

Among writers born in Iran, Shahrnush Parsipur ranks 57Before her are Hushang Ebtehaj (1928), Fakhruddin As'ad Gurgani (1001), Mohammad-Ali Jamalzadeh (1892), Mahmoud Dowlatabadi (1940), Mohammad-Reza Shafiei Kadkani (1939), and Masih Alinejad (1976). After her are Ahmad NikTalab (1934), Marina Nemat (1965), Roya Hakakian (1966), and Man Haron Monis (1964).