RELIGIOUS FIGURE

Nahshon

Photo of Nahshon

Icon of person Nahshon

In the Hebrew Bible, Nahshon (Hebrew: נַחְשׁוֹן‎ Naḥšon) was a tribal leader of the Judahites during the wilderness wanderings of the Book of Numbers. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Nahshon has received more than 153,052 page views. His biography is available in 21 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 20 in 2019). Nahshon is the 1,065th most popular religious figure (down from 1,039th in 2019), the 249th most popular biography from Egypt and the 25th most popular Egyptian Religious Figure.

Memorability Metrics

  • 150k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 67.03

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 21

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 6.49

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 1.91

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Nahshons by language


Among RELIGIOUS FIGURES

Among religious figures, Nahshon ranks 1,065 out of 2,272Before him are Stanisław Dziwisz, Jean-Marie Villot, Nicanor the Deacon, Demetrios I of Constantinople, Adhemar of Le Puy, and Julian Cesarini. After him are Kartini, Margaret of Cortona, Felix of Valois, Muhammad ibn Ya'qub al-Kulayni, Edith Cavell, and Francesco Barberini.

Most Popular Religious Figures in Wikipedia

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In Egypt

Among people born in Egypt, Nahshon ranks 249 out of 520Before him are Neferure (-1500), Takelot I (-1000), Shepseskare (-2450), Yuya (-1500), Hesychius of Alexandria (500), and Neferkare II (-2150). After him are Al-Said Barakah (1260), Narriman Sadek (1933), Meketaten (-1348), Isidore of Pelusium (370), Prince Rahotep (-2700), and Jawhar (911).

Among RELIGIOUS FIGURES In Egypt

Among religious figures born in Egypt, Nahshon ranks 25Before him are Pope Shenouda III of Alexandria (1923), Basilides (117), Antipope Dioscorus (500), Didymus the Blind (313), Pope Dioscorus I of Alexandria (444), and Moses the Black (332). After him are Isidore of Pelusium (370), Pope Peter I of Alexandria (300), Pope Theophilus of Alexandria (310), Apollos (100), Pope Anianus of Alexandria (100), and Pope Tawadros II of Alexandria (1952).