WRITER

Molière

1622 - 1673

Photo of Molière

Icon of person Molière

Jean-Baptiste Poquelin (French pronunciation: [ʒɑ̃ batist pɔklɛ̃]; 15 January 1622 (baptised) – 17 February 1673), known by his stage name Molière (UK: , US: , French: [mɔljɛʁ]), was a French playwright, actor, and poet, widely regarded as one of the great writers in the French language and world literature. His extant works include comedies, farces, tragicomedies, comédie-ballets, and more. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed at the Comédie-Française more often than those of any other playwright today. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Molière has received more than 2,742,317 page views. His biography is available in 158 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 149 in 2019). Molière is the 19th most popular writer (up from 20th in 2019), the 14th most popular biography from France (up from 15th in 2019) and the 4th most popular French Writer.

Molière is most famous for his play "The Misanthrope."

Memorability Metrics

  • 2.7M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 83.86

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 158

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 10.89

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 5.72

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Notable Works

L' avare
Le misanthrope
Le bourgeois gentilhomme
Tartuffe
Le Malade imaginaire
Les femmes savantes
English drama
Le misanthrope
Classic Literature, Baptiste Poquelin, dit. Le Misanthrope, Molière, Jean
Les femmes savantes
French language, Classic Literature, Fiction
L' avare
Baptiste Poquelin, dit. L'Avare, Molière, Jean, Criticism and interpretation
A comedy in five acts. A widowed father, obsessed with his money, refuses to pay for the marriages of his two children.
Tartuffe
Translations into English, French drama, French language
1 online resource
Le bourgeois gentilhomme
French language, Readers, Classic Literature
Le misanthrope
Classic Literature, Baptiste Poquelin, dit. Le Misanthrope, Molière, Jean
Le Malade imaginaire
Translations from French, French drama, Welsh drama
Les femmes savantes
French language, Classic Literature, Fiction
Tartuffe
Translations into English, French drama, French language
1 online resource
L' avare
Baptiste Poquelin, dit. L'Avare, Molière, Jean, Criticism and interpretation
A comedy in five acts. A widowed father, obsessed with his money, refuses to pay for the marriages of his two children.

Among WRITERS

Among writers, Molière ranks 19 out of 7,302Before him are Sophocles, Franz Kafka, Miguel de Cervantes, Jules Verne, Virgil, and Albert Camus. After him are Anton Chekhov, Petrarch, Honoré de Balzac, Aesop, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Ovid.

Most Popular Writers in Wikipedia

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1622, Molière ranks 1After him are Charles X Gustav of Sweden, Carel Fabritius, Vincenzo Viviani, Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen, Bernhardus Varenius, Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie, Vittoria della Rovere, Nicolaes Pieterszoon Berchem, Juan de Valdés Leal, Karel Dujardin, and Christian Augustus, Count Palatine of Sulzbach. Among people deceased in 1673, Molière ranks 1After him are Charles de Batz de Castelmore d'Artagnan, Margaret Theresa of Spain, Salvator Rosa, Michał Korybut Wiśniowiecki, Semyon Dezhnev, Joan Blaeu, Regnier de Graaf, Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Eugene Maurice, Count of Soissons, Barent Fabritius, and Robert Moray.

Others Born in 1622

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Others Deceased in 1673

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In France

Among people born in France, Molière ranks 14 out of 6,770Before him are Louis Pasteur (1822), Louis XVI of France (1754), Claude Monet (1840), Jules Verne (1828), Montesquieu (1689), and Louis XV of France (1710). After him are Charles de Gaulle (1890), Honoré de Balzac (1799), Jean-Paul Sartre (1905), Alain Delon (1935), Henri Matisse (1869), and John Calvin (1509).

Among WRITERS In France

Among writers born in France, Molière ranks 4Before him are Voltaire (1694), Victor Hugo (1802), and Jules Verne (1828). After him are Honoré de Balzac (1799), Jean-Paul Sartre (1905), Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1900), Denis Diderot (1713), Alexandre Dumas (1802), Charles Baudelaire (1821), Émile Zola (1840), and Stendhal (1783).