COMPANION

Bernadette Chirac

1933 - Today

Bernadette Chirac

Bernadette Thérèse Marie Chirac (born Bernadette Thérèse Marie Chodron de Courcel; 18 May 1933) is a French politician and the widow of the former President Jacques Chirac. She and Chirac met as students at Sciences Po, and were married on 16 March 1956. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Bernadette Chirac has received more than 160,610 page views. Her biography is available in 20 different languages on Wikipedia making her the 507th most popular companion.

Memorability Metrics

  • 160k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 51.82

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 20

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 1.42

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 3.72

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Bernadette Chiracs by language


Among COMPANIONS

Among companions, Bernadette Chirac ranks 513 out of 586Before her are Toda of Pamplona, Abbad ibn Bishr, Joan of the Tower, Agnes of Brandenburg, Princess Louise of Denmark, and Prince Gustav of Denmark. After her are Princess Augusta of Prussia, Alice of Antioch, Aquilia Severa, Mécia Lopes de Haro, Mastani, and Joan of England, Queen of Scotland.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1933, Bernadette Chirac ranks 154Before her are Humberto Maschio, Hossein Nasr, Michel Sabbah, James Rosenquist, Madhubala, and Guido Crepax. After her are Otto Barić, Princess Marie Louise of Bulgaria, Marcos Alonso, Asha Bhosle, Francisco Javier Errázuriz Ossa, and Mark Eyskens.

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In France

Among people born in France, Bernadette Chirac ranks 2,423 out of 4,109Before her are Corbinian (670), Alain Connes (1947), Jules Simon (1814), Maximilien Luce (1858), Paul Lévy (1886), and Gérard de Villiers (1929). After her are Henry Beaufort (1374), André Leducq (1904), Prosper Jolyot de Crébillon (1674), César-François Cassini de Thury (1714), Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville (1697), and Jacques Leroy de Saint-Arnaud (1798).