WRITER

Arthur Conan Doyle

1859 - 1930

Arthur Conan Doyle

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British writer, who created the character Sherlock Holmes. Originally a physician, in 1887 he published A Study in Scarlet, the first of four novels and more than fifty short stories about Holmes and Dr. Watson. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Arthur Conan Doyle has received more than 4,871,643 page views. His biography is available in 107 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 41st most popular writer.

Memorability Metrics

  • 4.9M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 81.28

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 107

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 11.49

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 4.18

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Arthur Conan Doyles by language


Among WRITERS

Among WRITERS, Arthur Conan Doyle ranks 41 out of 4,883Before him are Horace, Stendhal, Marcel Proust, Henrik Ibsen, George Orwell, and Astrid Lindgren. After him are Aeschylus, Hermann Hesse, Oscar Wilde, Thomas Mann, Rumi, and Daniel Defoe.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1859, Arthur Conan Doyle ranks 1After him are Wilhelm II, German Emperor, Pierre Curie, Henri Bergson, Knut Hamsun, L. L. Zamenhof, Edmund Husserl, John Dewey, Svante Arrhenius, Georges Seurat, Alfred Dreyfus, and Yuan Shikai. Among people deceased in 1930, Arthur Conan Doyle ranks 1After him are Fridtjof Nansen, Alfred Wegener, Ilya Repin, Vladimir Mayakovsky, William Howard Taft, Fritz Pregl, Allvar Gullstrand, Joan Gamper, Miguel Primo de Rivera, Christiaan Eijkman, and D. H. Lawrence.

Others Born in 1859

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Others Deceased in 1930

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In United Kingdom

Among people born in United Kingdom, Arthur Conan Doyle ranks 28 out of 5,347Before him are Richard I of England (1157), John Lennon (1940), Alan Turing (1912), Mary II of England (1662), Alfred Hitchcock (1899), and Margaret Thatcher (1925). After him are John Maynard Keynes (1883), Alexander Graham Bell (1847), Alexander Fleming (1881), Daniel Defoe (1660), David Hume (1711), and Mary I of England (1516).