The Most Famous

FENCERS from France

Icon of occuation in country

This page contains a list of the greatest French Fencers. The pantheon dataset contains 174 Fencers, 28 of which were born in France. This makes France the birth place of the most number of Fencers.

Top 10

The following people are considered by Pantheon to be the top 10 most legendary French Fencers of all time. This list of famous French Fencers is sorted by HPI (Historical Popularity Index), a metric that aggregates information on a biography’s online popularity. Visit the rankings page to view the entire list of French Fencers.

Photo of Lucien Gaudin

1. Lucien Gaudin (1886 - 1934)

With an HPI of 61.51, Lucien Gaudin is the most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 21 different languages on wikipedia.

Lucien Alphonse Paul Gaudin (27 September 1886 – 23 September 1934) was a French fencer. He competed in foil and in épée events at the 1920, 1924 and 1928 Olympics and won a gold or silver medal in every event he entered, accumulating four gold and two silver medals total. This record is tied for the best French Olympics performance, matching fencers Christian d'Oriola (four gold and two silver) then followed by both Philippe Cattiau and Roger Ducret (three gold, four silver and one bronze). Gaudin also won two international champion's titles in épée (1905 and 1918), the European title in épée (1921, first edition) and nine consecutive French titles in foil (1906–1914). Some sources claim that Gaudin was on the silver-medal sabre team in 1920, crediting him with an Olympic medal in each weapon. However, the IOC medalist database does not award Gaudin a medal in that event, the full results of the event show that he did not fence, and numerous lists of competitors do not include him on the team.After retiring from competitions Gaudin became a journalist and co-owner of the company Les Films Sportifs, which produced the 1924 Olympic film. Gaudin committed suicide in 1934 when his company went bankrupt. The history is unclear but a cocktail has been named after Lucien Gaudin. It is made of gin, white vermouth, a red vermouth or bitter aperitif and an orange liqueur like Cointreau (or Triple Sec or Grand Marnier).

Photo of Gaston Alibert

2. Gaston Alibert (1878 - 1917)

With an HPI of 60.46, Gaston Alibert is the 2nd most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 18 different languages.

Gaston Alibert (February 22, 1878 in Paris – December 26, 1917) was a French fencer and olympic champion in épée competition.He received a gold medal in épée individual and a gold medal in épée team at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. Eight years before, Alibert already participated in the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris placing seventh in the épée individual event. He contacted tuberculosis while at the front in World War I.

Photo of Jehan Buhan

3. Jehan Buhan (1912 - 1999)

With an HPI of 60.33, Jehan Buhan is the 3rd most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 17 different languages.

Jehan Buhan (April 5, 1912 – September 14, 1999) was a French fencer and Olympic champion in foil competition. He received a gold medal in foil individual at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. He received gold medals in foil team both in 1948 and in 1952.

Photo of Roger Ducret

4. Roger Ducret (1888 - 1962)

With an HPI of 59.94, Roger Ducret is the 4th most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 19 different languages.

Roger Ducret (2 April 1888 – 8 January 1962) was a French fencer who competed at the 1920, 1924 and 1928 Olympics. At the 1924 Summer Olympics he entered five events out of six and earned a gold or silver medal in each of them, winning individual medals in all three competitive fencing disciplines: épée, foil and sabre. During his times, only one fencer did better, the Italian Nedo Nadi won five gold medals at the 1920 Summer Olympics. During World War I Ducret was a prisoner of war. After retiring from competitions he worked as a journalist for Le Figaro, L'Echo des Sports and other newspapers.

Photo of Georges Buchard

5. Georges Buchard (1893 - 1987)

With an HPI of 58.21, Georges Buchard is the 5th most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 15 different languages.

Georges Buchard (21 December 1893 – 22 January 1987) was a French fencer. He won medals in the épée competition at four Olympic Games.

Photo of Émile Coste

6. Émile Coste (1862 - 1927)

With an HPI of 57.78, Émile Coste is the 6th most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 18 different languages.

Émile Coste (2 February 1862 in Toulon – 7 July 1927) was a French fencer who competed in the late 19th century and early 20th century. He participated in Fencing at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris and won the gold medal in the foil, defeating fellow French fencer Henri Masson in the final.

Photo of Jean-Baptiste Mimiague

7. Jean-Baptiste Mimiague (1871 - 1929)

With an HPI of 57.55, Jean-Baptiste Mimiague is the 7th most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 15 different languages.

Jean-Baptiste Mimiague (3 February 1871 – 6 August 1929) was a French fencer who competed in the early 20th century. He participated in Fencing at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris and won both his bouts against the famous Italian fencer Italo Santelli. He won the bronze medal in the individual foil masters.

Photo of Alexandre Lippmann

8. Alexandre Lippmann (1881 - 1960)

With an HPI of 57.11, Alexandre Lippmann is the 8th most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 16 different languages.

Alexandre Lippmann (11 June 1881 – 23 February 1960) was a French Olympic champion épée fencer. He won two Olympic gold medals, as well as three other Olympic medals.

Photo of Lucien Mérignac

9. Lucien Mérignac (1873 - 1941)

With an HPI of 56.80, Lucien Mérignac is the 9th most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 15 different languages.

Lucien Mérignac (October 5, 1873 in Paris – March 1, 1941) was a French fencer who competed in the late 19th century and early 20th century. He participated in Fencing at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris and won the gold medal in the masters foil, defeating fellow French fencer Alphonse Kirchhoffer in the final.

Photo of Daniel Revenu

10. Daniel Revenu (1942 - )

With an HPI of 56.14, Daniel Revenu is the 10th most famous French Fencer.  His biography has been translated into 16 different languages.

Daniel Revenu (born December 5, 1942 in Issoundun, Indre, France) is a French fencer and Olympic champion in foil competition, and medalists in four successive Olympics. Daniel Revenu is the son of French fencing coach Ernest Revenu, from Melun. In the 1960s and 1970s Ernest Revenu trained Olympic, world and national fencing champions - Bruno Boscherie, Bernard Talvard, Hugues Leseur, Daniel Provost, Jacky Courtillat, Frédéric Pietruszka and his own son Daniel.Daniel Revenu received a gold medal in foil team at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, together with Gilles Berolatti, Christian Noël, Jean-Claude Magnan and Jacques Dimont. He participated and received medals at the 1964, 1968, 1972 and 1976 summer Olympics.

Pantheon has 28 people classified as fencers born between 1862 and 1986. Of these 28, 15 (53.57%) of them are still alive today. The most famous living fencers include Daniel Revenu, Christian Noël, and Yves Dreyfus. The most famous deceased fencers include Lucien Gaudin, Gaston Alibert, and Jehan Buhan. As of October 2020, 18 new fencers have been added to Pantheon including Gaston Alibert, Georges Buchard, and Émile Coste.

Living Fencers

Go to all Rankings

Deceased Fencers

Go to all Rankings

Newly Added Fencers (2020)

Go to all Rankings

Which Fencers were alive at the same time? This visualization shows the lifespans of the 12 most globally memorable Fencers since 1700.