OCCULTIST

Nostradamus

1503 - 1566

Nostradamus

Michel de Nostredame (depending on the source, 14 or 21 December 1503 – 1 or 2 July 1566), usually Latinised as Nostradamus, was a French astrologer, physician and reputed seer, who is best known for his book Les Prophéties, a collection of 942 poetic quatrains allegedly predicting future events. The book was first published in 1555 and has rarely been out of print since his death. Nostradamus's family was originally Jewish, but had converted to Catholic Christianity before he was born. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Nostradamus has received more than 7,279,769 page views. His biography is available in 93 different languages on Wikipedia making him the most popular occultist.

Memorability Metrics

  • 7.3M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 84.73

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 93

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 11.80

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 3.70

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Nostradamuses by language


Among OCCULTISTS

Among occultists, Nostradamus ranks 1 out of 6After him are Rajneesh, Grigori Rasputin, John Dee, Baba Vanga, Edgar Cayce, and Edward Kelley.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1503, Nostradamus ranks 1After him are Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor, Bronzino, Parmigianino, Christian III of Denmark, Isabella of Portugal, Henry II of Navarre, Anne of Bohemia and Hungary, John Frederick I, Elector of Saxony, Pier Luigi Farnese, Duke of Parma, Robert Estienne, and Thomas Wyatt. Among people deceased in 1566, Nostradamus ranks 2Before him is Suleiman the Magnificent. After him are Diane de Poitiers, Bartolomé de las Casas, Nikola IV Zrinski, Daniele da Volterra, Leonhart Fuchs, Louise Labé, Antonio de Cabezón, Taddeo Zuccari, Johannes Agricola, and Sigismund von Herberstein.

Others Born in 1503

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Others Deceased in 1566

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In France

Among people born in France, Nostradamus ranks 12 out of 4,109Before him are Victor Hugo (1802), Blaise Pascal (1623), Molière (1622), Louis Pasteur (1822), Claude Monet (1840), and Jules Verne (1828). After him are Jean-Paul Sartre (1905), Montesquieu (1689), Louis XVI of France (1754), Honoré de Balzac (1799), Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1900), and Charles de Gaulle (1890).