PRESENTER

Joey Bishop

Joey Bishop

Joseph Abraham Gottlieb (February 3, 1918 – October 17, 2007), known professionally as Joey Bishop, was an American entertainer who appeared on television as early as 1948 and eventually starred in his own weekly comedy series playing a talk/variety show host, then later hosted a late night talk show with Regis Philbin as his young sidekick on ABC. He also was a member of the "Rat Pack" with Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Joey Bishop has received more than 1,638,728 page views. His biography is available in 20 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 36th most popular presenter.

Memorability Metrics

  • 1.6M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 44.32

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 20

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 1.76

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 3.86

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Joey Bishops by language


Among PRESENTERS

Among presenters, Joey Bishop ranks 34 out of 94Before him are Howard Stern, Regis Philbin, Barbara Walters, Casey Kasem, Steve Allen, and Bob Barker. After him are Alex Trebek, Yoo Jae-suk, Benny Hinn, Jimmy Kimmel, Jon Stewart, and Stephen Colbert.

Most Popular Presenters in Wikipedia

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In United States

Among people born in United States, Joey Bishop ranks 5,818 out of 12,171Before him are Carleton S. Coon (null), Abraham Polonsky (1910), Miriam Hopkins (1902), Arthur Golden (1956), John Schneider (1960), and Ally Sheedy (1962). After him are Little Crow (1810), Frank O'Hara (1926), Robert A. Parker (1936), Niles Eldredge (1943), John Larroquette (1947), and Donald H. Peterson (1933).

Among PRESENTERS In United States

Among presenters born in United States, Joey Bishop ranks 21Before him are Howard Stern (1954), Regis Philbin (1931), Barbara Walters (1929), Casey Kasem (1932), Steve Allen (1921), and Bob Barker (1923). After him are Jimmy Kimmel (1967), Jon Stewart (1962), Stephen Colbert (1964), Ryan Dunn (1977), Rush Limbaugh (1951), and Red Skelton (1913).