RELIGIOUS FIGURE

Saint Nicholas

270 - 342

Saint Nicholas

Saint Nicholas of Myra (traditionally 15 March 270 – 6 December 343), also known as Nicholas of Bari, was an early Christian bishop of the ancient Greek maritime city of Myra in Asia Minor (Ancient Greek: Μύρα, modern-day Demre, Turkey) during the time of the Roman Empire. Because of the many miracles attributed to his intercession, he is also known as Nicholas the Wonderworker. Saint Nicholas is the patron saint of sailors, merchants, archers, repentant thieves, prostitutes, children, brewers, pawnbrokers, and students in various cities and countries around Europe. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Saint Nicholas has received more than 4,995,520 page views. His biography is available in 82 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 26th most popular religious figure.

Memorability Metrics

  • 5.0M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 81.54

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 82

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 12.05

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 3.40

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Saint Nicholas by language


Among RELIGIOUS FIGURES

Among religious figures, Saint Nicholas ranks 27 out of 2,001Before him are Aaron, Saint Joseph, John Calvin, Matthew the Apostle, Ali, and Andrew the Apostle. After him are James, son of Zebedee, Abu Bakr, John the Apostle, Anthony of Padua, Pope John XXIII, and Pope Benedict XVI.

Most Popular Religious Figures in Wikipedia

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 270, Saint Nicholas ranks 1After him are Demetrius of Thessaloniki, Maximinus II, Saint Spyridon, and Flavia Maximiana Theodora. Among people deceased in 342, Saint Nicholas ranks 1After him are Paul of Thebes and Emperor Cheng of Jin.

Others Born in 270

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Others Deceased in 342

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In Turkey

Among people born in Turkey, Saint Nicholas ranks 10 out of 901Before him are Suleiman the Magnificent (1494), Heraclitus (-535), Selim II (1524), Thales of Miletus (-623), Selim I (1470), and Mehmed the Conqueror (1432). After him are Ahmed I (1590), Murad IV (1612), Mimar Sinan (1490), Murad III (1546), Diogenes (-404), and Bayezid I (1354).