POLITICIAN

Priam

Photo of Priam

Icon of person Priam

In Greek mythology, Priam (; Greek: Πρίαμος, pronounced [prí.amos]) was the legendary and last king of Troy during the Trojan War. He was the son of Laomedon. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Priam has received more than 1,154,904 page views. His biography is available in 57 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 56 in 2019). Priam is the 363rd most popular politician (up from 371st in 2019), the 61st most popular biography from Turkey (down from 59th in 2019) and the 38th most popular Politician.

Priam is most famous for being the king of Troy in Homer's Iliad. He was the son of Laomedon and the father of Hector, Paris, and Cassandra.

Memorability Metrics

  • 1.2M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 75.16

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 57

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 15.07

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 2.28

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Priam by language


Among POLITICIANS

Among politicians, Priam ranks 363 out of 15,577Before him are Edward VIII, Golda Meir, Barack Obama, Herod Antipas, Shimon Peres, and George V. After him are Gerald Ford, Chagatai Khan, Sokollu Mehmed Pasha, Władysław II Jagiełło, Eva Perón, and Henry VI of England.

Most Popular Politicians in Wikipedia

Go to all Rankings

In Turkey

Among people born in Turkey, Priam ranks 61 out of 1,301Before him are Julian (331), Abdul Hamid I (1725), Şehzade Mehmed (1522), Constantine XI Palaiologos (1404), Mustafa II (1664), and Gregory of Nazianzus (329). After him are Saint Blaise (300), Abdulmejid I (1823), Selim III (1761), Mahmud I (1696), Mithridates VI of Pontus (-132), and Aspasia (-470).

Among POLITICIANS In Turkey

Among politicians born in Turkey, Priam ranks 38Before him are Croesus (-596), Ertuğrul (1198), Julian (331), Abdul Hamid I (1725), Constantine XI Palaiologos (1404), and Mustafa II (1664). After him are Abdulmejid I (1823), Selim III (1761), Mahmud I (1696), Mithridates VI of Pontus (-132), Osman III (1699), and Mustafa III (1717).