POLITICIAN

Podalirius

Photo of Podalirius

Icon of person Podalirius

In Greek mythology, Podalirius or Podaleirius or Podaleirios (Ancient Greek: Ποδαλείριος) was a son of Asclepius. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Podalirius has received more than 74,677 page views. His biography is available in 18 different languages on Wikipedia. Podalirius is the 6,902nd most popular politician (down from 5,999th in 2019), the 380th most popular biography from Greece (down from 358th in 2019) and the 171st most popular Politician.

Memorability Metrics

  • 75k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 56.02

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 18

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 8.81

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 1.32

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Podaliriuses by language


Among POLITICIANS

Among politicians, Podalirius ranks 6,902 out of 15,577Before him are Humberto Delgado, Mikhail of Vladimir, Pierre Bérégovoy, Su Tseng-chang, Hermann Kövess von Kövessháza, and Frederick I, Duke of Anhalt. After him are Seonjong of Goryeo, Hajime Sugiyama, Thorbjörn Fälldin, Masaharu Homma, Sati Beg, and Géraud Duroc.

Most Popular Politicians in Wikipedia

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In Greece

Among people born in Greece, Podalirius ranks 380 out of 936Before him are Philo of Larissa (-145), Telesilla (-500), Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark (1906), Isaac Carasso (1874), Aristomenes (-700), and Demades (-380). After him are Princess Katherine of Greece and Denmark (1913), Eupalinos (-600), Tiberius Claudius Narcissus (50), Zoilus (-400), Phaedon Gizikis (1917), and Aristo of Chios (-300).

Among POLITICIANS In Greece

Among politicians born in Greece, Podalirius ranks 171Before him are Demophon of Athens (null), Theagenes of Thasos (-500), Miltiades the Elder (-600), Theopompus of Sparta (-800), Aristomenes (-700), and Demades (-380). After him are Princess Katherine of Greece and Denmark (1913), Tiberius Claudius Narcissus (50), Phaedon Gizikis (1917), Meleager (-320), Constantine Phaulkon (1647), and Antalcidas (-500).