WRITER

Nossis

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Nossis (Greek: Νοσσίς) was a Hellenistic Greek poet from Epizephyrian Locris in southern Italy. She seems to have been active in the early third century BC, as she wrote an epitaph for the Hellenistic dramatist Rhinthon. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Nossis has received more than 30,110 page views. Her biography is available in 19 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 16 in 2019). Nossis is the 3,543rd most popular writer (up from 3,793rd in 2019), the 2,760th most popular biography from Italy (down from 2,549th in 2019) and the 197th most popular Italian Writer.

Memorability Metrics

  • 30k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 61.09

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 19

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 5.30

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 2.01

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Notable Works

Page views of Nosses by language


Among WRITERS

Among writers, Nossis ranks 3,543 out of 5,794Before her are Sigbjørn Obstfelder, Olaf Bull, Maxwell Anderson, Jacob of Edessa, Yusuf Idris, and Bernard Pivot. After her are Radclyffe Hall, Elena Văcărescu, Charlie Kaufman, Jean Tardieu, Alfred Kerr, and Zülfü Livaneli.

Most Popular Writers in Wikipedia

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In Italy

Among people born in Italy, Nossis ranks 2,760 out of 4,088Before her are Armando Picchi (1935), Francesco Marchisano (1929), Aldo Nadi (1899), Fernando Tambroni (1901), Vannoccio Biringuccio (1480), and Erri De Luca (1950). After her are Enrico Chiesa (1970), Ulisse Dini (1845), Sergio Martino (1938), Paolo Sardi (1934), Cecco Angiolieri (1260), and Giacomo Biffi (1928).

Among WRITERS In Italy

Among writers born in Italy, Nossis ranks 197Before her are Roberto Saviano (1979), Francesco de Sanctis (1817), Carlo Rosselli (1899), Alfredo M. Bonanno (1937), Remmius Palaemon (100), and Erri De Luca (1950). After her are Cecco Angiolieri (1260), Vasco Pratolini (1913), Luigi Alamanni (1495), Tullio Pinelli (1908), Lino Aldani (1926), and Cristina Trivulzio Belgiojoso (1808).