CHEMIST

Michael Levitt

1947 - Today

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Michael Levitt, (Hebrew: מיכאל לויט; born 9 May 1947) is a South African-born biophysicist and a professor of structural biology at Stanford University, a position he has held since 1987. Levitt received the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, together with Martin Karplus and Arieh Warshel, for "the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems". Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Michael Levitt has received more than 384,722 page views. His biography is available in 50 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 48 in 2019). Michael Levitt is the 276th most popular chemist (up from 297th in 2019), the 29th most popular biography from South Africa (up from 31st in 2019) and the most popular South African Chemist.

Memorability Metrics

  • 380k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 67.22

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 50

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 4.81

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 4.57

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Michael Levitts by language


Among CHEMISTS

Among chemists, Michael Levitt ranks 276 out of 510Before him are Yuan T. Lee, Geoffrey Wilkinson, Leopold Gmelin, Hideki Shirakawa, Jacques Dubochet, and Johann Deisenhofer. After him are William Lipscomb, Karl Barry Sharpless, Andreas Libavius, Carl Gustaf Mosander, Richard Abegg, and Ben Feringa.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1947, Michael Levitt ranks 100Before him are Kathrine Switzer, Ron Dennis, Peter Weller, Ljupko Petrović, Edward James Olmos, and Viktor Suvorov. After him are David Letterman, Kazimierz Deyna, David Byron, Lucas Papademos, David Helfgott, and Walter Röhrl.

Others Born in 1947

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In South Africa

Among people born in South Africa, Michael Levitt ranks 29 out of 312Before him are Steve Biko (1946), Jody Scheckter (1950), Allan MacLeod Cormack (1924), Cyril Ramaphosa (1952), Seymour Papert (1928), and D. F. Malan (1874). After him are André Brink (1935), Arnold Vosloo (1962), Abba Eban (1915), Peter Abrahams (1919), Cetshwayo kaMpande (1826), and Kgalema Motlanthe (1949).

Among CHEMISTS In South Africa

Among chemists born in South Africa, Michael Levitt ranks 1

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