POLITICIAN

Leo III the Isaurian

675 - 741

Leo III the Isaurian

Leo III the Isaurian, also known as the Syrian (Greek: Λέων ὁ Ἴσαυρος, romanized: Leōn ho Isauros; c. 685 – 18 June 741), was Byzantine Emperor from 717 until his death in 741 and founder of the Isaurian dynasty. He put an end to the Twenty Years' Anarchy, a period of great instability in the Byzantine Empire between 695 and 717, marked by the rapid succession of several emperors to the throne. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Leo III the Isaurian has received more than 374,959 page views. His biography is available in 57 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 655th most popular politician.

Memorability Metrics

  • 370k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 70.73

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 57

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 10.24

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 3.26

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Leo III the Isaurians by language


Among POLITICIANS

Among politicians, Leo III the Isaurian ranks 650 out of 14,801Before him are Vytautas, Shunzhi Emperor, Chlothar I, Süleyman Demirel, Albert I of Belgium, and Tigranes the Great. After him are Camillo Benso, Count of Cavour, Afonso I of Portugal, Conrad III of Germany, Yaroslav the Wise, John Zápolya, and Sima Yi.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 675, Leo III the Isaurian ranks 1After him is Tervel of Bulgaria. Among people deceased in 741, Leo III the Isaurian ranks 2Before him is Charles Martel. After him are Pope Gregory III and Theudoald.

Others Born in 675

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Others Deceased in 741

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In Turkey

Among people born in Turkey, Leo III the Isaurian ranks 100 out of 901Before him are Anacreon (-570), Enver Pasha (1881), Antinous (111), Abdülaziz (1830), Pedanius Dioscorides (40), and Süleyman Demirel (1924). After him are Saint Pantaleon (275), Michael VIII Palaiologos (1224), Cassius Dio (155), Ephrem the Syrian (306), Photios I of Constantinople (900), and Zoë Porphyrogenita (978).