GAME DESIGNER

Hideo Kojima

1963 - Today

Hideo Kojima

Hideo Kojima (小島 秀夫, Kojima Hideo, born August 24, 1963) is a Japanese video game designer, director, producer and writer. Regarded as an auteur of video games, he developed a strong passion for action/adventure cinema and literature during his childhood and adolescence. In 1986, he was hired by Konami, for which he designed and wrote Metal Gear (1987) for the MSX2, a game that laid the foundations for stealth games and the Metal Gear series, his best known and most appreciated works. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Hideo Kojima has received more than 4,199,670 page views. His biography is available in 34 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 2nd most popular game designer.

Memorability Metrics

  • 4.2M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 57.58

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 34

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 6.73

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 2.71

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Hideo Kojimas by language


Among GAME DESIGNERS

Among GAME DESIGNERS, Hideo Kojima ranks 2 out of 37Before him are Shigeru Miyamoto. After him are Gunpei Yokoi, Satoru Iwata, Satoshi Tajiri, Jeff Kinney, Sid Meier, Gary Gygax, Shinji Mikami, Toru Iwatani, Hironobu Sakaguchi, and Yu Suzuki.

Most Popular GAME DESIGNERS in Wikipedia

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1963, Hideo Kojima ranks 34Before him are Andrej Kiska, Natasha Richardson, Rick Rubin, Jean-Pierre Papin, Emilio Butragueño, and Dunga. After him are Brigitte Nielsen, Emmanuelle Béart, Til Schweiger, Rumen Radev, Yngwie Malmsteen, and Geert Wilders.

Others Born in 1963

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In Japan

Among people born in Japan, Hideo Kojima ranks 308 out of 3,113Before him are Otoya Yamaguchi (1943), Ashikaga Yoshiaki (1537), Yukio Hatoyama (1947), Kenji Doihara (1883), Hisaichi Terauchi (1879), and Oichi (1547). After him are Masaki Kobayashi (1916), Shimazu Yoshihiro (1535), Emperor Kōbun (648), Takashi Takabayashi (1931), Sesshū Tōyō (1420), and Emperor Rokujō (1164).