WRITER

Heinrich Böll

1917 - 1985

Heinrich Böll

Heinrich Theodor Böll (German: [bœl]; 21 December 1917 – 16 July 1985) was one of Germany's foremost post–World War II writers. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Heinrich Böll has received more than 378,245 page views. His biography is available in 90 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 143rd most popular writer.

Memorability Metrics

  • 380k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 74.10

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 90

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 10.50

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 4.10

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Heinrich Bölls by language


Among WRITERS

Among WRITERS, Heinrich Böll ranks 143 out of 4,883Before him are Catullus, Emily Brontë, Ismail I, H. P. Lovecraft, Sigrid Undset, and H. G. Wells. After him are Sully Prudhomme, William Faulkner, Haruki Murakami, Georges Simenon, Novalis, and Elias Canetti.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1917, Heinrich Böll ranks 3Before him are John F. Kennedy and Indira Gandhi. After him are Arthur C. Clarke, I. M. Pei, Ella Fitzgerald, Eric Hobsbawm, Kenan Evren, Ilya Prigogine, Sidney Sheldon, Dean Martin, and Ernest Borgnine. Among people deceased in 1985, Heinrich Böll ranks 5Before him are Marc Chagall, Yul Brynner, Enver Hoxha, and Konstantin Chernenko. After him are Orson Welles, Fernand Braudel, Carl Schmitt, Italo Calvino, Charles Francis Richter, Dian Fossey, and Rock Hudson.

Others Born in 1917

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Others Deceased in 1985

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In Germany

Among people born in Germany, Heinrich Böll ranks 101 out of 3,763Before him are Leopold Mozart (1719), Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor (1368), Nikolaus Harnoncourt (1929), Baron Munchausen (1720), Nikolaus Otto (1832), Ludwig II of Bavaria (1845), and Theodor W. Adorno (1903). After him are Erich Honecker (1912), Georg Wittig (1897), Novalis (1772), Friedrich Fröbel (1782), Pope Joan (null), Carl von Clausewitz (1780), and Georg Philipp Telemann (1681).