BASEBALL PLAYER

Hank Aaron

1934 - Today

Hank Aaron

Henry Louis Aaron (born February 5, 1934), nicknamed "Hammer" or "Hammerin' Hank," is an American retired Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder who serves as the senior vice president of the Atlanta Braves. He played 21 seasons for the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves in the National League (NL) and two seasons for the Milwaukee Brewers in the American League (AL), from 1954 through 1976. Aaron held the MLB record for career home runs for 33 years, and he still holds several MLB offensive records. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Hank Aaron has received more than 3,018,100 page views. His biography is available in 37 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 6th most popular baseball player.

Memorability Metrics

  • 3.0M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 52.74

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 37

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 2.02

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 4.94

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Hank Aarons by language


Among BASEBALL PLAYERS

Among baseball players, Hank Aaron ranks 6 out of 36Before him are Joe DiMaggio, Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson, Lou Gehrig, and Sadaharu Oh. After him are Ichiro Suzuki, Ty Cobb, Mickey Mantle, Ted Williams, Yogi Berra, and Roberto Clemente.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1934, Hank Aaron ranks 135Before him are Claude Zidi, Kira Muratova, Franc Rode, Nino Ferrer, Ken Matthews, and George Chakiris. After him are Frankie Valli, George Segal, Lucien Muller, Cláudio Hummes, Ralph Nader, and Harlan Ellison.

Others Born in 1934

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In United States

Among people born in United States, Hank Aaron ranks 2,655 out of 12,171Before him are Hal Moore (1922), Liev Schreiber (1967), George Chakiris (1934), Tim Conway (1933), Eric Maskin (1950), and Dolores Costello (1903). After him are Nat Turner (1800), John Basilone (1916), Marc Jacobs (1963), J. Presper Eckert (1919), Casey Affleck (1975), and Alfred P. Sloan (1875).