ATHLETE

Guy Butler

Guy Butler

Guy Montagu Butler (25 August 1899 – 22 February 1981) was a British sprinter, winner of the gold medal in the 4 × 400 m relay at the 1920 Summer Olympics. With four Olympic medals Guy Butler shares the British record for the number of medals in athletics with Sebastian Coe and Mo Farah. Butler was born in Harrow, Middlesex, to Edward Montagu Butler and Gertrude Mary Fair. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Guy Butler has received more than 2,243 page views. His biography is available in 15 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 441st most popular athlete.

Memorability Metrics

  • 2.2k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 44.24

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 15

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 6.04

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 1.69

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Guy Butlers by language


Among ATHLETES

Among athletes, Guy Butler ranks 444 out of 2,090Before him are Norman Read, Bill Holland, Leonid Spirin, Piero D'Inzeo, František Janda-Suk, and Rafer Johnson. After him are Wyndham Halswelle, Maria Mutola, John Akii-Bua, Harry Porter, Frank Loomis, and Ondina Valla.

Most Popular Athletes in Wikipedia

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In United Kingdom

Among people born in United Kingdom, Guy Butler ranks 3,099 out of 5,347Before him are M.I.A. (1975), Benjamin Vulliamy (1747), Reginald Innes Pocock (1863), John Ireland (1879), Danny Blanchflower (1926), and Dan Stevens (1982). After him are David Dunbar Buick (1854), Wyndham Halswelle (1882), Jack Straw (1946), Benjamin Jones (1882), Paul Simonon (1955), and Alan Ball Jr. (1945).

Among ATHLETES In United Kingdom

Among athletes born in United Kingdom, Guy Butler ranks 19Before him are John Rimmer (1878), Jonathan Edwards (1966), Dorian Yates (1962), Edwin Flack (1873), John Ainsworth-Davis (1895), and Norman Read (1931). After him are Wyndham Halswelle (1882), Victor d'Arcy (1887), Gordon Pirie (1931), Dorothy Tyler-Odam (1920), Jack Beresford (1899), and David Cecil, 6th Marquess of Exeter (1905).