SOCCER PLAYER

Eric Abidal

1979 - Today

Eric Abidal

Eric Sylvain Abidal (French pronunciation: ​[eʁik abidal]; born 11 September 1979) is a French former professional footballer who played as a left back or centre back, and the director of football at FC Barcelona. In his career, he played mainly for Lyon and Barcelona, winning 18 titles with both teams combined, including two Champions League trophies with the latter. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Eric Abidal has received more than 305,370 page views. His biography is available in 58 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 479th most popular soccer player.

Memorability Metrics

  • 310k

    Page Views (PV)

  • 54.41

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 58

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 11.78

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 2.73

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Eric Abidals by language


Among SOCCER PLAYERS

Among soccer players, Eric Abidal ranks 477 out of 13,233Before him are Orlando Peçanha, Ali Daei, Philipp Lahm, Ivan Rakitić, Carlos José Castilho, and Juan Sebastián Verón. After him are Milan Galić, Ivo Viktor, Jenő Buzánszky, Sjaak Swart, Sachi Kagawa, and Koji Funamoto.

Most Popular Soccer Players in Wikipedia

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1979, Eric Abidal ranks 10Before him are Kimi Räikkönen, Anders Behring Breivik, Diego Forlán, Chris Pratt, James McAvoy, and Jason Momoa. After him are Prince Carl Philip, Duke of Värmland, Diego Milito, Evangeline Lilly, Rosamund Pike, Michael Owen, and Jennifer Love Hewitt.

Others Born in 1979

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In France

Among people born in France, Eric Abidal ranks 1,968 out of 4,109Before him are Adhémar Jean Claude Barré de Saint-Venant (1797), Fernand Cormon (1845), Adélaïde d'Orléans (1777), Tino Rossi (1907), Jean-Féry Rebel (1666), and Johann Hermann (1738). After him are Adélaïde Labille-Guiard (1749), Guillaume Dupuytren (1777), Claude Goudimel (1514), Avitus of Vienne (450), Fulk IV, Count of Anjou (1043), and René Pleven (1901).