PHILOSOPHER

Democritus

460 BC - 360 BC

Democritus

Democritus (; Greek: Δημόκριτος, Dēmókritos, meaning "chosen of the people"; c. 460 – c. 370 BC) was an Ancient Greek pre-Socratic philosopher primarily remembered today for his formulation of an atomic theory of the universe.Democritus was born in Abdera, Thrace, around 460 BC, although there are disagreements about the exact year. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Democritus has received more than 2,027,449 page views. His biography is available in 91 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 37th most popular philosopher.

Memorability Metrics

  • 2.0M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 80.35

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 91

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 8.50

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 4.54

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Democrituses by language


Among PHILOSOPHERS

Among philosophers, Democritus ranks 35 out of 1,005Before him are Averroes, Søren Kierkegaard, Martin Heidegger, David Hume, Sun Tzu, and Diogenes. After him are Plutarch, Auguste Comte, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Thomas More, Michel Foucault, and Maria Montessori.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 460 BC, Democritus ranks 2Before him is Hippocrates. After him are Thucydides, Critias, Diogenes of Apollonia, Prodicus, and Verginia. Among people deceased in 360 BC, Democritus ranks 1After him are Agesilaus II, Atropates, Dinocrates, Campaspe, Aeschines of Sphettus, Agnodice, Anniceris, Polykleitos the Younger, Bryaxis, Philitas of Cos, and Taxiles.

Others Born in 460 BC

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Others Deceased in 360 BC

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In Greece

Among people born in Greece, Democritus ranks 16 out of 698Before him are Spartacus (-109), Pericles (-494), El Greco (1541), Aeschylus (-525), Philip II of Macedon (-382), and Aristophanes (-448). After him are Plutarch (46), Thucydides (-460), Sappho (-630), Kösem Sultan (1590), Bayezid II (1447), and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (1921).