POLITICIAN

Charles the Bald

823 - 877

Charles the Bald

Charles ΙΙ the Bald (13 June 823 – 6 October 877) was the king of West Francia (843–877), king of Italy (875–877) and emperor of the Carolingian Empire (875–877). After a series of civil wars during the reign of his father, Louis the Pious, Charles succeeded, by the Treaty of Verdun (843), in acquiring the western third of the Carolingian Empire. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Charles the Bald has received more than 1,119,420 page views. His biography is available in 69 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 211th most popular politician.

Memorability Metrics

  • 1.1M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 76.80

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 69

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 10.31

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 3.19

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Page views of Charles the Balds by language


Among POLITICIANS

Among politicians, Charles the Bald ranks 209 out of 14,801Before him are Victor Emmanuel II of Italy, Klemens von Metternich, Louis XII of France, William the Silent, Heraclius, and Lee Kuan Yew. After him are Pargalı Ibrahim Pasha, Mars, George W. Bush, Salvador Allende, Osman II, and Alexander I of Russia.

Most Popular Politicians in Wikipedia

Go to all Rankings

Contemporaries

Among people born in 823, Charles the Bald ranks 1After him are Muhammad I of Córdoba and Pepin II of Aquitaine. Among people deceased in 877, Charles the Bald ranks 1After him are John Scotus Eriugena, Halfdan Ragnarsson, Causantín mac Cináeda, Ignatios of Constantinople, and Jayavarman III.

Others Born in 823

Go to all Rankings

Others Deceased in 877

Go to all Rankings

In Germany

Among people born in Germany, Charles the Bald ranks 64 out of 3,763Before him are Charles Bukowski (1920), Frederick the Great (1712), Robert Koch (1843), Klemens von Metternich (1773), William the Silent (1533), and Ludwig Feuerbach (1804). After him are Erich Fromm (1900), Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762), William I, German Emperor (1797), Erich Maria Remarque (1898), Richard Strauss (1864), and Jacques Offenbach (1819).