WRITER

Aesop

620 BC - 564 BC

Photo of Aesop

Icon of person Aesop

Aesop ( EE-sop or AY-sop; Greek: Αἴσωπος, Aísopos; c. 620–564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Aesop has received more than 2,038,883 page views. His biography is available in 92 different languages on Wikipedia (up from 90 in 2019). Aesop is the 21st most popular writer (down from 20th in 2019), the most popular biography from Bulgaria and the most popular Bulgarian Writer.

Memorability Metrics

  • 2.0M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 88.17

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 92

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 16.24

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 3.03

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Notable Works

Page views of Aesops by language


Among WRITERS

Among writers, Aesop ranks 21 out of 5,794. Before him are Honoré de Balzac, Albert Camus, Sophocles, Virgil, Petrarch, and Jean-Paul Sartre. After him are Anton Chekhov, Alexander Pushkin, Giovanni Boccaccio, Agatha Christie, Ovid, and Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

Most Popular Writers in Wikipedia

Go to all Rankings

Contemporaries

Among people born in 620 BC, Aesop ranks 1After him are Alcaeus of Mytilene and Sushruta. Among people deceased in 564 BC, Aesop ranks 1

Others Born in 620 BC

Go to all Rankings

Others Deceased in 564 BC

Go to all Rankings

In Bulgaria

Among people born in Bulgaria, Aesop ranks 1 out of 313. After him are Ahmed III (1673), Flavius Aetius (390), Elias Canetti (1905), Galerius (250), Belisarius (505), Aurelian (214), Georgi Dimitrov (1882), Maximinus Thrax (173), Boris III of Bulgaria (1894), Phocas (547), and Marcian (396).

Among WRITERS In Bulgaria

Among writers born in Bulgaria, Aesop ranks 1After him are Elias Canetti (1905), Saint Naum (830), Georgi Markov (1929), Chernorizets Hrabar (890), Hristo Botev (1848), Ivan Vazov (1850), Sabahattin Ali (1907), Elin Pelin (1877), Georgi Sava Rakovski (1821), Anton Pann (1796), and Nikola Vaptsarov (1909).