WRITER

Émile Zola

1840 - 1902

Émile Zola

Émile Édouard Charles Antoine Zola (, also US: , French: [emil zɔla]; 2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was a French novelist, playwright, journalist, the best-known practitioner of the literary school of naturalism, and an important contributor to the development of theatrical naturalism. Read more on Wikipedia

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Émile Zola has received more than 1,879,860 page views. His biography is available in 104 different languages on Wikipedia making him the 49th most popular writer.

Memorability Metrics

  • 1.9M

    Page Views (PV)

  • 80.67

    Historical Popularity Index (HPI)

  • 104

    Languages Editions (L)

  • 10.27

    Effective Languages (L*)

  • 4.41

    Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Notable Works

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Among WRITERS

Among writers, Émile Zola ranks 48 out of 4,883Before him are Hermann Hesse, Oscar Wilde, Thomas Mann, Rumi, Daniel Defoe, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. After him are Aristophanes, Simone de Beauvoir, Denis Diderot, Euripides, Giacomo Casanova, and Jane Austen.

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Contemporaries

Among people born in 1840, Émile Zola ranks 3Before him are Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and Claude Monet. After him are Auguste Rodin, Murad V, Victoria, Princess Royal, Alphonse Daudet, Odilon Redon, John Boyd Dunlop, Crazy Horse, Ernst Abbe, and Edward Drinker Cope. Among people deceased in 1902, Émile Zola ranks 1After him are Cecil Rhodes, Levi Strauss, Rudolf Virchow, Swami Vivekananda, Maria Goretti, Samuel Butler, Marie Henriette of Austria, Richard von Krafft-Ebing, Francis, Duke of Cádiz, Ion Ivanovici, and Albert of Saxony.

Others Born in 1840

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Others Deceased in 1902

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In France

Among people born in France, Émile Zola ranks 34 out of 4,109Before him are Marcel Proust (1871), Antoine Lavoisier (1743), Louis XV of France (1710), Henry IV of France (1553), Alain Delon (1935), and Édith Piaf (1915). After him are Simone de Beauvoir (1908), Denis Diderot (1713), Édouard Manet (1832), Auguste Comte (1798), Émile Durkheim (1858), and Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841).